Dehydrated Strawberries are an easy way to make the most of a summer abundance of strawberries. They are as sweet as candy without actually being candy – the perfect kind of treat.

A bowl of dehydrated strawberries on a wood background with some daisies and small purple flowers scattered around.

🥘 Ingredients Needed

A bunch of overripe strawberries laid out on a wooden surface with daisies and purple flowers scattered around.
  • Ripe Strawberries: Seriously, the more ripe your strawberries are – the better they will taste. If the strawberries are starting to get some soft spots, they will be super sweet and so good.
  • Optional: lemon juice, sugar, or honey

🍽 Equipment Needed

  • A Dehydrator – I use an Excalibur Dehydrator – it’s intense. We got it as a wedding present, and I use it for everything, from dehydrated cherry tomatoes and dried honey suckle blossoms to dried watermelon. I also have a smaller dehydrator that I got at Goodwill for $5 – it is the older version of this dehydrator. It works well, it just gets really hot, so I have to turn it off and let it cool down every few hours if it is running for a while.
  • Alternatively, you can use an oven and a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a non-stick baking mat.
  • A Cutting Board
  • A Sharp Knife

🥣 How to Make Dehydrated Strawberries

Dehydrating strawberries is a really easy way to make a healthy, sweet treat.

STEP 1: Slice your strawberries into 1/4 inch pieces. There are two different ways to do this – I have shown them in options a and b. I slice the tops off (save them – see below), then either option a) slice them lengthwise, or option b) slice them through the middle in circles.

A process collage of images for making dehydrated strawberries, step 1 - sliced strawberries.

STEP 2: Lay the strawberries out on the tray of a dehydrator, ideally not touching each other so that they can dry fully on all sides. Optionally, you can drizzle them with a little lemon juice or sprinkle a little sugar on them, but we don’t think it is needed. (Picture 2)

A process collage of images for making dehydrated strawberries, step 2 - sliced strawberries on the tray of a dehydrator.

STEP 3: Place the trays in the dehydrator, then set the temperature on the dehydrator to the fruit setting, on mine it is 135°F. If you are using a smaller dehydrator that doesn’t have temperature control, just turn it on. (Picture 3)

STEP 4: Set a timer for 6 hours, but check the fruit after a few (maybe 3 or 4) hours to make sure that everything is drying out as expected. It should take between 6 and 10 hours to try out fully – if cut evenly, they should all be done in 8 hours. (Picture 4)

A process collage of images for making dehydrated strawberries, step 3 - 4.

Totally optional, but I like to also dehydrate the tops of the strawberries and feed them our dog as treats. Sometimes she acts like she likes them. You can also dry them out and save them to steep and make strawberry tea!

The tops of strawberries laid out on the tray of a dehydrator.

STEP 5: The final step is to “condition” your strawberries. If you put them into an airtight container when they are warm and fresh out of the dehydrator, you will trap moisture and they will likely grow mold or get soft.

Let the strawberries come to room temperature, then place them in an airtight container. I like to use glass jars over plastic because I have noticed that things like dried fruit, crackers, chips, etc. will start to absorb the taste of plastic after a while.

a spilled jar of dehydrated strawberries with a bag of desiccant packs

For about 7 days, check on your strawberries daily, shaking the jar around and checking for moisture. Once you are certain that the strawberries are completely dry, place a desiccant pack in the jar with them and place them in a dry place that doesn’t get really hot.

an infographic describing how to condition strawberries

🙋‍♀️ Frequently Asked Questions

How long does it take to dehydrate strawberries?

Strawberries take about 8 hours to dry. It is pretty difficult to cut every piece to the same thickness, so it could take anywhere from 6 – 10 hours for all the pieces to fully dehydrate.

Can you dehydrate frozen strawberries?

You can absolutely dehydrate frozen strawberries. Either use pre-sliced strawberries or slice the strawberries while they are frozen – if you let them defrost, they will be really mushy and hard to cut.

Can you dehydrate strawberries in the oven?

Yep! Set your oven to the lowest temperature possible – mine is about 180°F – and spread the strawberries out on a baking sheet with a non-stick mat or parchment covering it. Bake for 2 hours, then flip the strawberries over. Continue baking for a half-hour, then check for “doneness” every 10 -15 from there on out. Strawberries can burn easily at this stage so watch them carefully. Let them cool and store immediately with a desiccant pack as they will most likely not be 100% dried out.

an excalibur dehydrator

🍳 Serving Suggestions & Uses

Once your dehydrated strawberries have been properly conditioned, you can eat them as snacks, add them to trail mix, cereal, oatmeal, or desserts. They are also really good if you let them steep in lemonade (Peach Lemonade with Bourbon and dried strawberries?) or tea.

A bowl of dehydrated strawberries on a wood background with some daisies and small purple flowers scattered around.

🥫 Storage/Shelf Life/Reheating

Dried strawberries will last a long time as long as they are properly conditioned and stored correctly. If you add a desiccant pack and store your strawberries in a dry place away from drastic temperature changes, they could last years.

What is a Desiccant Pack/Packet?

Desiccant packets are those little silica gel packets you find in your new shoes that say “DO NOT EAT!!” all over them. The idea is that they should actively absorb any moisture in the container that they are stored in so that whatever they are stored with does not; so dehydrated foods, leather goods, etc. Be sure that you use a food-safe brand and that you use the right size for your storage. (You don’t need a 50 gram pack in a small mason jar!)

I like to use Wisedry 5 gram Packs for most of my food storage. They are small enough for a jar, and the beads change color to a dark green when saturated with moisture so you know to change out the pack. (Once you take out a pack, you can “recharge it” by drying it back out and reusing it, which is also really cool.)

a bag of desiccant packs
a jar of dehydrated strawberries with a bag of desiccant packs

✏️ Helpful Tips

  • Waiting until your strawberries are really ripe and are starting to get a little soft makes them super duper sweet. You can dehydrate strawberries at any stage of ripeness, but the riper they are, the sweeter they will be!
  • Dehydrate a lot more than you think you will want. They are so yummy and you will be happy you made a lot. There really isn’t much of a time difference between slicing 15 strawberries and 25 strawberries and if you are already running your dehydrator, you might as well fill it up!
  • If you are using a dehydrator that does not have temperature control, the strawberries might dry faster than if you set the temperature to 135°F.

Share on Facebook

🍓 Try These Other Fruit Recipes

Button linking to the Pinterest page for Southern Bytes.

Have You Tried This Recipe?

Please rate it and leave a comment below. I would love to hear what you think!

Want to save this recipe?
Just enter your email and get it sent to your inbox! Plus you’ll get new recipes from us every week!
A bowl of dehydrated strawberries on a wood background with some daisies and small purple flowers scattered around.

Dehydrated Strawberries

4.67 from 3 votes
Dehydrated Strawberries are an easy way to make the most of a summer abundance of strawberries. They are as sweet as candy without actually being candy – the perfect kind of treat.
Author: Kari
Servings: 4
Prep: 5 minutes
Cook: 8 hours
Conditioning: 7 days
Total: 7 days 8 hours 5 minutes

Ingredients  

  • 1 pint strawberries at least, you can use as many as you can fit in your dehydrator

Optional

Instructions 

  • Slice the strawberries into 1/4 inch pieces. There are two different ways to do this – I have shown them in options a and b. I slice the tops off (save them – see below), then either option a) slice them lengthwise, or option b) slice them through the middle in circles.
    Sliced strawberries on a white cutting board.
  • Lay the strawberries out on the tray of a dehydrator, ideally not touching each other so that they can dry fully on all sides. Optionally, you can drizzle them with a little lemon juice or sprinkle a little sugar on them, but we don't think it is needed.
    Sliced strawberries on the tray of a dehydrator.
  • Place the trays in the dehydrator, then set the temperature on the dehydrator to the fruit setting, on mine it is 135°F. If you are using a smaller dehydrator that doesn't have a temperature control, just turn it on.
    Sliced strawberries on the trays of a dehydrator.
  • Set a timer for 6 hours, but check the fruit after a few (maybe 3 or 4) hours to make sure that everything is drying out as expected. It should take between 6 and 10 hours to try out fully – if cut evenly, they should all be done in 8 hours.
    The dial of a dehydrator set to 135 degrees.
  • Totally optional, but I like to also dehydrate the tops of the strawberries and feed them our dog as treats. Sometimes she acts like she likes them. You can also dry them out and save them to steep and make strawberry tea!
    The tops of strawberries laid out on the tray of a dehydrator.
  • Dehydrated strawberries are ready when they are chewy with a little bit of bend to them – kind of like the pliable but tearable texture of jerky.
    A dehydrator tray with sliced strawberries on it.
  • The final step is to "condition" your strawberries. If you put them into an airtight container when they are warm and fresh out of the dehydrator, you will trap moisture and they will likely grow mold or get soft. 
  • Let the strawberries come to room temperature, then place them in an airtight container. I like to use glass jars over plastic because I have noticed that things like dried fruit, crackers, chips, etc. will start to absorb the taste of plastic after a while. 
    A jar of dehydrated strawberries on a wood background with some daisies scattered around.
  • For about 7 days, check on your strawberries daily, shaking the jar around and checking for moisture. Once you are certain that the strawberries are completely dry, place a desiccant pack in the jar with them and place them in a dry place that doesn't get really hot. 
    a spilled jar of dehydrated strawberries with a bag of desiccant packs
  • Enjoy when you want something sweet!

Notes

Frequently Asked Questions
Can you dehydrate frozen strawberries?
You can absolutely dehydrate frozen strawberries. Either use pre-sliced strawberries or slice the strawberries while they are frozen – if you let them defrost, they will be really mushy and hard to cut.
Can you dehydrate strawberries in the oven?
Yep! Set your oven to the lowest temperature possible – mine is about 180°F – and spread the strawberries out on a baking sheet with a non-stick mat or parchment covering it. Bake for 2 hours, then flip the strawberries over. Continue baking for half an hour, then check for “doneness” every 10 -15 from there on out. Strawberries can burn easily at this stage so watch them carefully. Let them cool and store immediately with a desiccant pack as they will most likely not be 100% dried out. 
 
Serving Suggestions/Uses
Once your dehydrated strawberries have been properly conditioned, you can eat them as snacks, add them to trail mix, cereal, oatmeal, or desserts. They are also really good if you let them steep in lemonade (Peach Lemonade with Bourbon and dried strawberries?) or tea.
Storage/Shelf Life
Dried strawberries will last a long time as long as they are properly conditioned and stored correctly. If you add a desiccant pack and store your strawberries in a dry place away from drastic temperature changes, they could last years.
Tips
  • Waiting until your strawberries are really ripe and are starting to get a little soft makes them super duper sweet. You can dehydrate strawberries at any stage of ripeness, but the riper they are, the sweeter they will be!
  • Dehydrate a lot more than you think you will want. They are so yummy and you will be happy you made a lot. There really isn’t much of a time difference between slicing 15 strawberries and 25 strawberries and if you are already running your dehydrator, you might as well fill it up!
  • If you are using a dehydrator that does not have temperature control, the strawberries might dry faster than if you set the temperature to 135°F.

Special Equipment Needeed

Nutrition

Serving: 1pint berriesCalories: 151kcalCarbohydrates: 36gProtein: 3gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 5mgPotassium: 724mgFiber: 9gSugar: 23gVitamin A: 57IUVitamin C: 278mgCalcium: 76mgIron: 2mg

Nutrition information is approximate and is automatically calculated, so should only be used as a guide.

Course: Breakfast, Condiments, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American, Southern
Keyword: dehydrated fruit, dehydrated strawberries, dried strawberries
Did you make this recipe?Mention @southernbytes or tag #southernbytes!

Filed Under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hi, I'm Kari!

I am a newlywed, food blogger, health coach, and mama to a hot mess of a border collie. I love to put a new spin on old family recipes and I try to make as many meals as possible with an Instant Pot.

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating